The Future of News

Or "Reality Bytes"

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Google Acquihires Luke Wroblewski and his Online Poll Company Polar for Google+

Mr. Wroblewski is an evangelist of mobile design. Three years ago, he published a book called “Mobile First,” which “makes the case for why websites and applications should increasingly be designed for mobile first” and outlines ways for web design teams to move from designing apps for desktops and laptops to designing them for mobile phones.

Google Acquires Online Poll Company Polar,” Conor Dougherty, NYT

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Google and NYT collaborating on ad content promoting Google Search App

From AdAge:

Google has struck a deal with The New York Times to create a type of branded newsroom.

"We’re building a newsroom that runs in parallel with theirs," Mr. Whipps said. Writers from Google’s creative team will work with New York Times staff to write search queries that tie into the newspaper’s top news stories and will appear in the banner ad slot atop the newspaper site’s homepage in real time. The writers will be coming up with queries "that are going to the next level on any particular topics that are trending for The New York Times," he said.

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Google Breaks Mobile-Focused Effort During NFL Opener Tonight,” Tim Peterson, Ad Age

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Publishers: Ditch your apps; focus on mobile Web

More coverage of the comScore app research:

Publishers: Ditch your apps; focus on mobile Web.” Digiday

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When we asked people in an initial survey what type of content they preferred to see in their [Facebook] News Feeds, 80% of the time people preferred headlines that helped them decide if they wanted to read the full article before they had to click through.
News Feed FYI: Click-baiting,” Facebook Newsroom Blog, h/t to @tracysamantha

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Most smartphone users download zero apps per month

Most smartphone users download zero apps per month,” Joel Ryan, Quartz

Filed under app smartphones

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Organization site search is still not working

"To solve search we must think about finding, not searching. We must think content, not technology. At a fundamental level, we need to change the way we reward staff and manage findability. Right now, we reward based on inputs: hours worked, content created and published, projects launched. It is enough for a content professional to say to their manager: “Here is the content I’ve created.” The manager will not ask them: “How findable is your content?” Unless findability becomes a management metric then search will continue to fail."

Organization site search is still not working,” Gerry McGovern