The Future of News

Or "Reality Bytes"

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Apple iPad Loses Tablet Market Share - InformationWeek

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If Apple’s product lines were their own companies now, which corporations would they stack up against?
First, about the iPhone. Apple moved 35.2 million of the devices this quarter, generating $19.75 billion in sales—a sum larger than Amazon’s last reported quarterly revenue. It’s also (as Derek Thompson has noted) more than the revenues at Coca-Cola and McDonald’s combined. Stack Google and eBay on top of one another, and they barely beat out the little hand-computer.

“If Apple Products Were Their Own Companies, They’d Be as Big as ..,” Jordan Weisman, Slate.com

If Apple’s product lines were their own companies now, which corporations would they stack up against?

First, about the iPhone. Apple moved 35.2 million of the devices this quarter, generating $19.75 billion in sales—a sum larger than Amazon’s last reported quarterly revenue. It’s also (as Derek Thompson has noted) more than the revenues at Coca-Cola and McDonald’s combined. Stack Google and eBay on top of one another, and they barely beat out the little hand-computer.

If Apple Products Were Their Own Companies, They’d Be as Big as ..,” Jordan Weisman, Slate.com

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Meet the Online Tracking Device That is Virtually Impossible to Block

…this type of tracking, called canvas fingerprinting, works by instructing the visitor’s Web browser to draw a hidden image. Because each computer draws the image slightly differently, the images can be used to assign each user’s device a number that uniquely identifies it.

Meet the Online Tracking Device That is Virtually Impossible to Block,” Julia Angwin, ProPublica.com

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Beginning this week, absolutely everything new that we publish—the work in the print magazine and the work published online only—will be unlocked. All of it, for everyone. Call it a summer-long free-for-all.
In “A Note to Our Readers,” the New Yorker’s editors announce that NewYorker.com has gone responsive, they’re posting all content online and it’s all unlocked for the summer, they’re implementing a meter in the fall and all print archives, back to 2007, are now available.

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"Social Media Tuesdays" teach journalists at USA Today how to think like their readers

For Social Media Tuesdays, the staff must act as if there is no other way to get their articles except through sites likes Facebook and Reddit. That means USA Today’s journalists diligently place each of their famously punchy, graphic-rich stories onto various social media platforms. The purpose is to get them thinking like their readers, who increasingly get news through their Twitter feeds instead of the paper’s front page or home page.

For now, he and USA Today’s editor in chief, David Callaway, are coming up with all sorts of strategies to drive Internet traffic. All of the paper’s journalists have tools allowing them to track the online viewership of their stories. An electronic board displayed prominently in the newsroom tracks overall top performers. Reporters are not penalized if their articles do not make the list, but their skills at promoting their articles online are considered as important as front page bylines.

A premium is placed on reporters’ speed and digital output. Because search engines give higher rankings to USA Today’s original content rather than wire service stories, Mr. Kramer has insisted that 95 percent of its digital content is produced in-house — and goes up quickly. Only 15 percent of the USA Today online stories run in the print edition. “Reporters have to write 5- and 30-minute stories,” Mr. Kramer said.

USA Today Goes Viral,” Leslie Kaufman, NYT